WHAT IS THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS?

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Universal Declaration) is an international document that states basic rights and fundamental freedoms to which all human beings are entitled.

WHAT DOES THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION SAY?

The Universal Declaration begins by recognizing that ‘the inherent dignity of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world’. It declares that human rights are universal – to be enjoyed by all people, no matter who they are or where they live. The Universal Declaration includes civil and political rights, like the right to life, liberty, free speech and privacy. It also includes economic, social and cultural rights, like the right to social security, health and education.

WHEN WAS THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION CREATED?

The Universal Declaration was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 10, 1948 under the chairmanship of Eleanor Roosevelt, including 56 member countries of United Nations at Paris, after Second World War.